Archive for the 'Research & Design' Category

Oct 04 2013

Looking for Student Authors and Spotlights

Do you blog or update Facebook whenever you find a bad user interface? Consider posting on the HFIDO blog! This is a great way to share your thoughts with the greater HFIDO, Bentley and UX communities. Also, we want to show that HFIDers know a thing or two about UX :)

We are looking for students to post about:

  • Interesting insights on interfaces you experienced or worked on
  • UX book reviews
  • Experiences with events like conferences, hackathons, design jams, and etc.
  • Anything you want to share with HFIDO!

Also, we are still looking for student accomplishments for our Student Spotlight posts. Accomplishments can include publications, presentations, book reviews, awards, and other significant contributions.

Please contact Kathy Dang to post for the blog or to nominate someone for a Student Spotlight.

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Sep 13 2013

Axure Workshop Recap

Update 9/13: Added link to recording.

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Last night, Oscar Yépez taught a great introduction to Axure! We downloaded our own copy of Axure onto our laptops and learned how to create an interactive wireframe of an iPhone app. This included how to add objects, images, and actions to make the wireframe come alive. Also, Oscar showed how to effectively create wireframes through the use of master objects and dynamic panels.

For those of you who couldn’t make it, here is the link to the recording!

If you attended the workshop, we are looking for feedback for those who participated. Feel free to leave a comment on the blog or the Facebook page on what you thought of the workshop!

Special thanks to Oscar for providing HFIDers with a new UX skill!

 

Oscar shows HFIDers how to create an action in a wireframe

Oscar shows HFIDers how to create an action in a wireframe


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Aug 29 2013

Call for Student Accomplishments and Authors

HFIDO is made up of very talented and accomplished members and the HFIDO board wants to recognize YOU on our blog! We are looking for portfolios, publications, book reviews, experiences with hackathons, startup weekend projects you’d like to share, or interesting insights you’ve gained in the UX field, etc.

Please contact Kathy Dang to nominate yourself or someone you know.

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Jun 04 2013

Navigating Stormy Seas: Project Requirements

“As UX professionals, we generally have an abundant breadth of experience across different industries and businesses. Our clients, on the other hand, have great depth of knowledge in their own domain. However, only users themselves can intimately appreciate their own needs, and user experience is the only field that considers the user’s perspective at every stage of a project.” View the entire story at UXmatters.

One response so far

May 16 2013

On Publishing and Presenting

“When you do a lot of writing, you’ll end up with lots of ideas and articles at various stages, including your idea lists, articles you’ve just started writing, halfway-finished articles, completed drafts that you need to review, final versions you’re waiting to publish, and articles that have already been published. It’s hard to keep track of all these pieces without good organization.” Learn more at UXmatters.

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May 09 2013

Apple’s 6 Simple Rules for Designing Apps

Published by under Gadgets,Interfaces

“Among iOS developers, the day that you finally submit your app for Apple’s approval can be a tense one. Even when you’ve seemingly followed the guidelines, polished the code and passed every field test, Apple can still reject your app for almost any reason.” Learn more at Mashable.

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May 07 2013

When You Should(n’t) Use Fitts’s Law

“The key statement of Fitts’s Law is that the time required to move a pointing device to a target is a function of the distance to the target and its size. In layman’s terms: the closer and larger a target, the faster it is to click on that target. This is easy to understand, not too difficult to implement and it doesn’t seem to make much sense to contradict such a simple and obvious statement. However…” Learn more on Smashing Magazine.

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Apr 25 2013

Developing Tools to Create Semantic Web Content

“The Semantic Web is a movement that aims to add value and utility to online information by structuring data in a way that both computers and humans can understand. The goal: computer systems that can understand and infer meaning – for instance, a computer system that knows the difference between an “organ” that is a musical instrument, and an “organ” that lives inside your body. Services like Siri, Wolfram Alpha, and Knowledge Graph have shown us what it’s like to consume content on the Semantic Web. But what if your business wants to create Semantic Web content?” View the full article on The Globe and Mail.

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Apr 23 2013

Combining In-Person and Remote Research

“In-person user research has been around the longest, and is still widely used as a great way to gather feedback on websites, advertisements, or software. In-person research usually involves letting users perform tasks on a computer while asking them questions, observing their behaviors and body language, or having them think out loud. Additional hardware can be used, such as eye tracking devices.” See the full story at UX Magazine.

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Apr 18 2013

6 Key Questions for International UX Research

“Are you worried about how customers in other countries will react to your product or service? Not really sure who your international customers even are, or what they want and need? To find out, it might be time to pop outside the domestic market and conduct an international user research study.” Read the full article at UX Magazine.

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Apr 16 2013

Responsive Design: Content to Development

“The concept of responsive design—the practice of creating digital experiences that adapt to seamlessly deliver content suited to the device context of the user’s operating system, screen size, or orientation—has been around for quite some time. For a variety of reasons, more companies are now giving responsive design serious consideration. The implications of moving to a responsive approach of creating adaptable designs can seem overwhelming, but the benefits can be significant.” Read the complete article at UX Magazine.

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Mar 14 2013

Ditch Traditional Wireframes

Published by under Interfaces

Wireframes have played an increasingly leading role in the modern Web development process. They provide a simple way of validating user interface and layout and are cheaper and faster to produce than a final visual comp. However, most of the methods and techniques used to create them are far from being efficient, contradicting the principles and values that made wireframing useful in first place. – Read more about it at UX Magazine

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Mar 12 2013

“Product designers” and design team evolution

Product designers are jacks-of-all-trades, expected to deliver interaction design, information architecture, visual design, and even front-end code. – Read more about it at Peter Me

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Mar 07 2013

It’s all about the experience!

What today’s end-users want are deeper experiences for fulfilment, both online and offline. The role of a business now is to orchestrate such experiences for its customers, in such a way that the memory itself becomes part of the product – the “experience”. – Read the full article at Hyper Island

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Feb 26 2013

Design Patterns: When Breaking The Rules Is OK

Published by under Interfaces,New Students

“In 1977, the architect Christopher Alexander cowrote a book named A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction, introducing the concept of pattern language as “a structured method of describing good design practices within a field of expertise.” The goal of the book was to give ordinary people — not just architects and governments — a blueprint for improving their own towns and communities.” Read the full article at Smashing Magazine.

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Feb 21 2013

Ultimate List of Online Content Readability Tests

Published by under Interfaces,Psychology

“While the CIA’s The World Factbook may put the literacy rate of most highly developed nations at 99%—where those age 15 and older can read and write—that doesn’t account for how many can read and write well, or even comfortably. In the United States, one out of seven people have trouble reading anything more challenging than a single sentence, much less a string of them or a series of paragraphs. And in the United Kingdom, one in six struggles with literacy.” View the entire article at Raven Tools.

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Feb 19 2013

Google’s Project Glass: Inside The Prototyping

“At Google X, the company’s now-not-so-top-secret R&D lab, engineers and neuroscientists and artificial-intelligence experts dream up a future without the pressure of market deadlines: driverless cars, robots, space elevators. But for lead product manager Steve Lee, his X pursuits are anything but an exercise in the fantastical: Project Glass, the futuristic eyeware he’s developing with an interactive heads-up display, might just hit market in the near future alongside products like Gmail and Android.” Read the full story on Fast Co. Design.

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Feb 14 2013

Developing UX Agility: Letting Go of Perfection

“Over the last decade, the UX discipline has matured and demand for our skills has increased.  Many companies have created User Experience Design departments because they have come to recognize that product development efforts are vastly more successful when they include user research, task analysis, user-centered design, information architecture, and usability testing. We’ve built our understanding of our place in the product development world upon our ability to design great experiences, satisfy users, and reduce development risk and costs.” View the full article at UXmatters.

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Feb 12 2013

Why are Contextual Inquiries so Difficult?

“Contextual inquiries require a difficult balance between traditional interviewing and ethnographic observation. The name contextual inquiry is foreign to most people outside the field of user experience, and people don’t understand what this approach involves, leading to a lot of misconceptions. In this article, I’ll discuss the most common problems you’ll face when conducting contextual inquiries and how to solve them.” Read the full piece at UXmatters.

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Feb 01 2013

Survey DO’s & DON’Ts – 2/4 @ 7:30 in Smith 122

“Survey Design DO’s & DON’Ts”Miriam Gerver Donath, Mon. 2/4 @ 7:30-9:00 pm in Smith 122

Survey design is important because it affects response rate (item and unit) and data quality (introduce bias), which, in turn, affects survey results. As someone who might work directly or tangentially with a market research, or embark on your own research, this presentation will help you think about survey design issues and improve surveys you encounter, as well as give some guidelines and resources. These will be set within the cognitive response model of question comprehension, information retrieval, judgment in responding to a question, and providing a response. Learn more about Miriam Gerver Donath. This event will be recorded and can be attended remotely via Centra.

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